Libya and another Minister resigns: Gulf and Western failure after meddling

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Libya and another Minister resigns: Gulf and Western failure after meddling

Walter Sebastian and Murad Makhmudov

Modern Tokyo Times

LIBYA3

Another cabinet minister in the government of Libya resigned following on from the Deputy Prime Minister of Libya, Awadh al-Barassi, who resigned several weeks ago. This reality is highlighting the fact that while Gulf and major NATO powers are good at destabilizing nations; the next stage is usually followed by rampant corruption, religious militancy, a failed domino system and terrorism is part of the course. Therefore, the resignation of the Interior Minister, Mohammed Khalifa al-Sheikh, is yet further confirmation of the abject failure of Gulf and Western powers.

Lee Jay Walker of Modern Tokyo Times states that “Indeed, it appears that Gulf and Western powers – alongside Turkey and Pakistan (in relation to Afghanistan) – are only good at killing people when it comes to foreign policy, destabilizing nations, spreading Islamist militancy, putting women in the shadows, creating failed states and enabling terrorism to spread. After all, look at Afghanistan after more than 40 years of meddling and then focus on the reality of modern day Iraq, Libya and Syria (destabilization is ongoing). On top of this, other religious minorities like Christians also suffer greatly but this never concerns the usual players which thrive on chaos.”

In modern day Libya after Gulf and NATO powers interfered in this nation you had the lynching of black Africans, the brutal murders of pro-Gaddafi followers, deteriorating economy and yet another failed state. Other dark forces to enter the destabilization of Libya includes the growing menace of al-Qaeda affiliates, radical Salafi Islam, the destruction of Sufi shrines, increasing persecution towards the minority Christian community and the collapse of all central forces. The upshot of this is various different militias, chaos and a nation state which now relies on international nations for economic support despite this country once being independent.

Al-Barassi resigned because of “The lack of authority has hindered all efforts to deal with the government’s privileges and responsibilities towards the security situation in Benghazi and Libya as a whole…Most of the problems that occurred in various areas, and what followed in the form of a deterioration in security and the escalation in violence, were caused by the government policies.”

The words of al-Barassi are damning to say the least because the issue of authority is clear for all Libyans who are suffering. This applies to instability, corruption, the power of various militias and the reality that energy is the only real concern for outside nations in “the new Libya.” Libya, irrespective if people supported Gaddafi or not; is now another failed state whereby this once independent nation is now being dictated to by outside powers.

The BBC reports thatMr Sheikh said he lacked support of Prime Minister Ali Zeidan and complained of interference by members of the General National Congress (GNC).”

“The interior ministry has come under pressure to deal with violence that has plagued Libya since the 2011 uprising that toppled Muammar Gaddafi.”

He also made it clear that financial support was inadequate and the same applies to implementing genuine reforms. The reform issue also relates to moral support from the leaders of Libya. In other words, the cabinet is imploding based on the reality of modern day Libya. Therefore, while Gulf and NATO powers – alongside media distortions during the destabilization of nations – are good at drumming up the specter of war; the second part is nothing more than abject failure which points to crude lies from the start. However, these crude lies are killing vast numbers of people, putting pressure on minorities, creating dependency and other upheavals.

Lee Jay Walker gave guidance and support to both main writers

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-23750456

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

http://moderntokyotimes.com

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