Home » ukiyo-e and japanese art You are browsing entries tagged with “ukiyo-e and japanese art”

A Tale of the Tengu: Yoshitoshi’s Debt to Kuniyoshi

tengu6

A Tale of the Tengu – Yoshitoshi’s Debt to Kuniyoshi by toshidama Toshidama Gallery are celebrating the work of Taiso Yoshitoshi (1839 – 1892) this month with a show of twenty-one of his woodblock prints. One of the best pieces in the exhibition is Ushiwaka Maru learns Martial Arts From Sojobo, King of the Tengu from 1880 (above). It seems […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Art, Culture and Fashion during the Lifetime of Ogata Gekko (1859-1920)

gekko1

Japanese Art, Culture and Fashion during the Lifetime of Ogata Gekko (1859-1920) Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times Ogata Gekko was a very individualistic artist who had a rich style which was based on his upbringing.  This applies to mainly being self-taught but this can be over-played because his free spirit was from within. Also, […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Art and Yōshū Chikanobu: From Edo to Meiji

Chikanobu2

Japanese Art and Yōshū Chikanobu: From Edo to Meiji Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times This is a brief glimpse into the art work of Yoshu Chikanobu (Chikanobu Toyohara) who witnessed major changes in Japan.  He lived between 1838 and 1912 and this period in Japanese history is very dynamic. This applies to the ending […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Art and the World of Ukiyo-e: International Impact and Pushing the Boundaries

shoun5

Japanese Art and the World of Ukiyo-e: International Impact and Pushing the Boundaries Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times   The Japanese art form called ukiyo-e relates to many aspects of Japanese culture throughout the Edo and Meiji period. This is because this amazing art form was expansive and despite government interference from time to […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Ukiyo-e in a Changing Artistic Landscape: Chikanobu and the Impact of Modernity

Japanese Ukiyo-e in a Changing Artistic Landscape: Chikanobu and the Impact of Modernity Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times Yoshu Chikanobu (Toyohara Chikanobu) lived between 1838 and 1912 and much of his art highlights the changing nature of Japan. The opening up of the land of the rising sun after the Meiji Restoration provided many […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Folklore and Art: Kyosai and the World of the Tengu

Japanese Folklore and Art: Kyosai and the World of the Tengu  Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times The Japanese artist Kawanabe Kyosai is extremely fascinating because of his individualistic spirit and this is witnessed in his art. Kyosai, just like the mysterious Tengu, belonged to two worlds and this applies to the old Edo period […]

| | Read More »

Gajo: Traditional Bindings for Japanese Woodblock Prints

Gajo – Traditional Bindings for Japanese Woodblock Prints By toshidama There’s a fantastic feeling that you get when you hold a perfect ukiyo print in your hands, one that has escaped the ravages of time. Edo (Tokyo) has been plagued by fires which were so frequent in the past that they were referred to as the […]

| | Read More »

Toshidama Gallery and Japanese Art: Stunning Ukiyo-e and Japanese Culture

Toshidama Gallery and Japanese art: stunning ukiyo-e By toshidama Why? Why would these artists paint the same motif so many times over so many years? There is undoubtedly for both artists a spiritual dimension to their constant interest. For Hokusai who was a devout Buddhist, as for many Japanese, Fuji was symbolic of eternal life, a […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Art and Culture: Japan Ukiyo-e Museum in Matsumoto

Japanese Art and Culture: Japan Ukiyo-e Museum in Matsumoto Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Times Ukiyo-e expresses the richness of Japanese culture, nature, history, mythology, theatre, stunning landscapes, and highlights the importance of entertainment and other areas. Also, ukiyo-e shows vivid images of sexuality and some shunga is extremely explicit even by the standards of […]

| | Read More »

Japanese Gifts and Culture: Toshidama Explained

Japanese Gifts – Toshidama Explained By toshidama People sometimes say to us: “what is a Toshidama?” The characteristic round seal seen on many nineteenth century Japanese prints is called a Toshidama Seal. It was used at some point by most artists of the Utagawa School. At first it looks like the silhouette of a diamond ring with four […]

| | Read More »